Book Review: The Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel

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This book was read purely on #FOMO (fear of missing out), the Roanoke girls have a dark secret and I was desperate to know what it was!

Book Description:

Beautiful.
Rich.
Mysterious.

The Roanoke girls seem to have it all. But there’s a dark truth about them which is never spoken. Every girl either runs away, or dies.

Lane is one of the lucky ones. When she was fifteen, over one long, hot summer at her grandparents’ estate in rural Kansas, she found out what it really means to be a Roanoke girl. Lane ran, far and fast. Until eleven years later, when her cousin Allegra goes missing – and Lane has no choice but to go back.

She is a Roanoke girl.

Is she strong enough to escape a second time? Continue reading “Book Review: The Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel”

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February 2017 #WrapUp

The last day of the shortest month of the year is upon us, and that can only mean one thing, it’s wrap up time!

I read 9 books this month, down one on last month, but I’m happy with that number – I was aiming for 10 but February robbed me of 4 days, so really, I’m reading right on schedule! However, I’m still behind with reviews, but it’s likely to remain that way for the foreseeable future because not only am I the Keeper of Pages, I am also the Queen of Procrastination! Enough rambling, let’s take a look at what I’ve read this month…

The Good:

The standout reads of the month were:

Deep Down Dead by Steph Broadribb Continue reading “February 2017 #WrapUp”

#BookHaul: February 2017

Hey wonderful people, with the end of the month fast approaching, it’s that time again! Let’s take a look at the books I’ve hauled this month!

Review Copies:

As always, I’m extremely grateful to all the publishers/authors who have sent me these books to review.

Purged by Peter Laws

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Matt Hunter lost his faith a long time ago. Formerly a minister, now a professor of sociology, he’s writing a book that debunks the Christian faith while assisting the police with religiously motivated crimes. On holiday with his family in Oxfordshire, Matt finds himself on edge in a seemingly idyllic village where wooden crosses hang at every turn. The stay becomes more sinister still when a local girl goes missing, followed by further disappearances. Caught up in an investigation that brings memories to the surface that he would prefer stay buried deep, Matt is on the trail of a killer determined to save us all.

Fierce Kingdom by Gin Phillips Continue reading “#BookHaul: February 2017”

Book Review: Trust No One by Paul Cleave

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Trust No One has that ‘book within a book’ vibe to it, so I was excited when we chose it as our February Criminally Good Book Club read.

From the back cover:

Most of the world knows Jerry Grey by his crime writing pseudonym, Henry Cutter – a name that has been keeping readers at the edge of their seats for more than a decade. But now he’s been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s at the age of forty-nine, Jerry’s career is coming to an abrupt end.

His twelve books tell stories of brutal murders, of a world out of balance, of victims finding the darkest forms of justice. As his dementia continues to break down the wall between his real life and the lives of the characters, Jerry confesses his most terrible secret: the stories are real. He committed the crimes himself. His family, friends, caretakers insist that it’s all in his head, just a side effect of the devastating disease – but is it?

One of the most talented and trailblazing suspense writers at work today, Edgar-nominated author Paul Cleave takes us down a dark and clever path to determine the fine line between simple fact and dangerous fiction. Continue reading “Book Review: Trust No One by Paul Cleave”

Book Review: Burial Rites by Hannah Kent

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Burial Rites was the winner of my bookish bingo twitter poll, and I thank all who voted for it! Scandinavian Historical Crime Fiction, a beautiful combination that made for a gripping read.

From the back cover:

Northern Iceland, 1829.

A woman condemned to death for murdering her lover.

A family forced to take her in.

A priest tasked with absolving her.

But all is not as it seems, and time is running out:
winter is coming, and with it the execution date.

Only she can know the truth. This is Agnes’s story. Continue reading “Book Review: Burial Rites by Hannah Kent”